WA Secretary of State Blogs

UNUSUAL BIRD IS MADE A PRISONER

November 20th, 2014 Nono Burling Posted in For Libraries, For the Public, Random News from the Newspapers on Microfilm Collection, Uncategorized No Comments »

The jumblies and other nonsense verses" (1910) http://bit.ly/1pNxtrZ

The jumblies and other nonsense verses” (1910)
http://bit.ly/1pNxtrZ

From the desk of Steve Willis, Central Library Services Program Manager of the Washington State Library:

Edward Lear’s classic nonsense poem The Owl and Pussycat has such a charming conclusion:

 And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand,

They danced by the light of the moon,

The moon,

The moon,

They danced by the light of the moon.

 Well, er, that’s not exactly how this piece of Random News ends. It is an article that will mortify birders and make us cat lovers shake our heads sadly but knowingly. Our precious purring little pointy eared felines

dance at the thrill of the kill,

the kill,

the kill,

They dance at the thrill of the kill.

 But I am giving away the ending. owl newspaper

This installment of Random News comes from The Yakima Daily Republic, Jan. 15, 1910:

 UNUSUAL BIRD IS MADE A PRISONER

 What Is believed to Be an Elf Owl Has Wandered Far from its Native Haunts.

 Fowl Found Only in the Far South Is Taken on Nob Hill by J.B. Dougherty.

 What is believed to be an elf owl which naturalists say is seldom found further north than the border line of the United States, it rarely coming into California, has been captured in the Yakima valley. It was taken by J.B. Dougherty of Nob Hill Wednesday. The little bird offered no resistance, it appeared stunned by the cold weather.

 The little owl sat on the fence in front of Mr. Dougherty’s residence. As he approached the small fowl it showed no signs of fright and allowed its captor to put his hand around it without apparently the least alarm.

 Killed by the Cat.

 Mr. Dougherty released the little bird in the hope that it would fly away. It fell, however, a prey to the ever watchful eye of the house cat and was brought onto the porch of the house dead. The unusual appearance of the little bird aroused Mr. Dougherty’s curiosity and he took it to Taxidermist Harmer that he might ascertain the species.

 The body of the bird is scarcely larger than that of a canary, although its feathers, projecting almost at right angles from its body, gives it the appearance of being much larger. On the scales it tips the beam at less than two ounces.

 Mr. Harmer searched Dawson & Bowles’ Birds of Washington and was unable to find a description answering to this fowl. He went to the Color Key to North American Birds, a book known to the taxidermist as the bird dictionary. It is published by Frank M. Chapman and Chester A. Reed. There he found the elf owl, the description of which in every way answers to this unusual species.

 The book says that the range of the bird is on the tablelands of Mexico, from Pueblo north to the Mexican border of the United States and in lower California, rarely in California.

The birds of Washington : a complete, scientific and popular account of the 372 species of birds found in the state" (1909)  http://bit.ly/1uYfqGp

The birds of Washington : a complete, scientific and popular account of the 372 species of birds found in the state” (1909) http://bit.ly/1uYfqGp

 

 Its Colorings.

Its appearance is like that of any other owl except that it is very small. On the back it is a grayish brown, the head is spotted and the back is barred with rust. The under parts are irregularly spotted with an ashy gray.

The bird dictionary says the elf owl utters a tremulous “cha-cha” in different keys, sometimes low and distinct. There is no other description given than that already referred to.

 How this little species should have wandered so far from its native haunts is a wonder to all those who have seen it. Naturalists who have seen the little owl are even at a loss to give a theory as to how it ever became so far separated from its habitat.

 The bird will be mounted on the profile of a half moon.

 A modern work in the WSL collection, Elf owl : Micrathene whitneyi / Susanna G. Henry and Frederick R. Gehlbach (1999) confirms that the 1910 Yakima Elf Owl was indeed about 1000 miles outside its range. It is possible what Dougherty captured was in fact a Northern Pygmy Owl, which would be totally in range. However, the Pygmy Owl is included in Dawson and Bowles’ work and Harmer didn’t think his specimen in hand matched the description.

A viewing of that stuffed and mounted little owl would settle the issue, but the artifact has slipped away. Alfred Sterling Harmer, the taxidermist, had a variety of occupations. He was born in Ontario in 1879, became a United States citizen in 1901, and served overseas in the US Army during World War I. Harmer moved to Western Washington where he worked as an employee for Puget Power for 20 years. He died in Seattle, Nov. 12, 1951.

As for the fate of the feline, I guess the whole episode left a fowl taste in its mouth.elf owl

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WSL Updates for November 20, 2014

November 20th, 2014 Shirley Lewis Posted in For Libraries, For the Public, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates No Comments »

Volume 10, November 20, 2014 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) 2015 TEEN VIDEO CHALLENGE

2) JOHN TORNOW: VILLAIN OR VICTIM? EVENT

3) COMMUNITY FINANCIAL EDUCATION PROJECT

4) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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Library Clippings November 14, 2014

November 17th, 2014 Staci Phillips Posted in For Libraries, For the Public, News, Uncategorized, Updates No Comments »

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Library News

Olympia Library a hot spot for crime calls to police (The Olympian, Olympia, 09/28/14).

Book bonanza: Chinook Pass Lending Library takes delivery of $12,000 in donated volumes (Yakima Herald-Republic, Yakima, 10/01/14).

Woman charged with setting fire to books in Tacoma library
(The New Tribune, Tacoma, 10/21/14).

Books burned at main library, forcing it to close (The News Tribune, Tacoma, 10/19/14).

Friends’ projects bolster library programs (Liberty Lake Splash, Liberty Lake, 09/29/14).

Heywood provides commissioners with libraries’ strategic plan.
At last Tuesday’s (Sept. 23) Pacific County Commissioner’s meeting, Cheryl Heywood spoke on behalf of the Timberland Regional Library to report the new “strategic plan” for the upcoming year, including new resources, services, and programs the Timberland Libraries has to offer. (Willapa Harbor Herald, Raymond, 10/01/14).
Read the rest of this entry »

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WSL Updates for November 13, 2014

November 13th, 2014 Shirley Lewis Posted in For Libraries, News, Updates, Washington Talking Book and Braille Library No Comments »

Volume 10, November 13, 2014 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) “THIRD GRADE READING BILL” WEBINAR

2) EXPERIENCE ART 2014

3) EARLY LEARNING STEM INSTITUTE

4) ALA STRATEGIC PLANNING

5) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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Words of Wisdom from a future Washington voter.

November 12th, 2014 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, For Libraries, For the Public, Uncategorized No Comments »

amelie

 

Amelie, a third-grader at Lincoln Elementary School in Olympia, Washington, is learning to write persuasive essays. For this assignment her essay prompt was how can we improve our school? Amelie did not hesitate, she knew exactly what she and her fellow students needed.

 

amalie

(Spelling and grammar as per the original essay).

We need more library time:

We should get more lirarby time Becasue some of us Don’t have a Good amont of money so we need a library. And if we did not have a library we would not have Donna!! And we would not Get into a Good Collge!!  So this pretty much depenes on liBrary. ThereFore we sloud have more library.

When asked for a comment Donna Dannenmiller, Lincoln’s school librarian, said, “My greatest thrill for library time, as I foster literacy and expose children to a diverse collection of meaningful language experiences, is to connect the right book… with the right child… at the right time. It’s purely magical! They want to come back for more and more of that magic.”

Amelie is clearly one third grader who will be voting for libraries in the future.

 

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Library Clippings November 7, 2014

November 10th, 2014 Staci Phillips Posted in For Libraries, For the Public, News, Uncategorized, Updates No Comments »

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Image courtesy North Pend Oreille Heritage collection

Library News

 Commissioners seek applicants to serve on regional library board: One of three Clark County positions to be filled (Reflector, Battle Ground, 10/05/14).

Meyer Farm listed on Clark County Heritage Register. Meyers were active in critical decision-making in county(Reflector, Battle Ground, 10/15/14).

 Here’s the story on StoryCon (The Columbian, Vancouver, 10/17/14).

Library will reduce fines for those who donate food.

It may not seem like it, but one can of food can go a long way. Especially at the Burlington Public Library. This month, the library is participating in a Food for Fines program, where one donation of a canned or nonperishable good will knock $1 off patrons’ late fees. (Skagit Valley Herald, Mount Vernon, 10/06/14).

Elite Care at Sylvan Park opens lending library: Library stocked with resources for caregivers and diagnosed individuals (Reflector, Battle Ground, 09/17/14).

 City, schools link libraries, share resources: PT libraries join forces, focus education on Common Core, future economy (The Leader, Port Townsend, 09/24/14). Read the rest of this entry »

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WSL Updates for November 6, 2014

November 5th, 2014 Shirley Lewis Posted in For Libraries, News, Technology and Resources, Training and Continuing Education, Updates No Comments »

Volume 10, November 6, 2014 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) WORKFORCE INNOVATION AND OPPORTUNITY ACT

2) LETTERS ABOUT LITERATURE 2015

3) FREE BOOKS FOR WASHINGTON LIBRARIES

4) EARLY LEARNING STEM INSTITUTE

5) CAYAS FALL WORKSHOP REGISTRATION OPEN

6) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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Shoalwater Library honored by the Chamber of Commerce

November 5th, 2014 Nono Burling Posted in Articles, For Libraries, For the Public, Tribal No Comments »

exterior shot Shoalwater libraryOn October 14th, Mary-Jean Grimes, President of the Tokeland-North Cove Chamber of Commerce notified the Tribal Council that they have voted the Shoalwater Bay Tribal Community Library as the Business of the Year.  The Library’s name was sent to the Pacific County Economic Council for the County’s Business of the Year Celebration Dinner at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum in Ilwaco, Thursday, November 13, from 5PM to 7PM.

Having the chamber of commerce recognize that the Shoalwater tribal Library is an economic generator and a force for progress in the community is a wonderful accolade.

Congratulations to Shoalwater tribal librarian Linda Rose!

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A Sudden Light by Garth Stein

October 31st, 2014 mschaff Posted in Articles, For Libraries, For the Public, Public Services, State Library Collections, Washington Reads No Comments »

sudden-light-thumb

Washington Reads – A Sudden Light by Garth Stein (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2014. 416 pp.)

Recommendation by Mary Paynton Schaff, Reference Librarian, Washington State Library

Fall means ghosts, creepy old houses, and stories about families scarred by tragedy. So now’s the perfect opportunity to gather up your afghan, sit by the fire with a cup of hot cider, and dive into Garth Stein’s newest book, “A Sudden Light.”

Fourteen-year-old narrator Trevor is brought to crumbling Riddell House in north Seattle by his father in the summer of 1990. Trevor’s father Jones has a lot on his plate: settle the Riddell family estate, get his father into a nursing home, make amends to his sister Serena who has spent the better part of her life nursing their father, and make his peace with the untimely death of their mother. Last but not least, Trevor is hoping his father can find a way to repair his marriage to Trevor’s mother, despite the fact they are currently separated by thousands of miles. As Jones begins to wrestle with these issues, Trevor is drawn into the history of the storied Riddell family and the monumentally fascinating but literally decomposing Riddell House. Trevor is aided in his exploration of the house, and his family history, by an unlikely guide who reveals to him further betrayals, tragedies, and opportunities.

The Washington setting of “A Sudden Light” plays a crucial role in Trevor’s coming of age story. The Riddells make their fortune in logging, as many Northwest pioneers did. Each of Trevor’s ancestors has a relationship to the trees; cutting them, climbing them, or building something out of the wood. As the profits from the trees roll in, the Riddells became the fashionable aristocracy of Seattle society. Lumber barons make deals with railroad magnates. And when Trevor’s guide steers him to John Muir’s “The Mountains of California,” Trevor begins to wonder what costs might have incurred as the family chopped and bargained its way to the top.

There’s an enjoyable gothic overtone to “A Sudden Light.” Exploring an old haunted house has been a favorite literary device from Jane Eyre to Rebecca to Scooby Doo. The library, ballroom, locked trunks, and secret stairways you hope Trevor will find are all there. Adding to this reading satisfaction, Stein further layers in a generational family saga, lost journals in leather bindings, the relationship between fathers and sons, pairs of doomed lovers, conflicting promises, and the sublime joy that can be found in nature. (This librarian experienced such joy simply reading Stein’s description of historical research undertaken in a pre-internet public library, using microfilm no less!)

So rest your bones and dig into this satisfying Northwest work of fiction.

ISBN-10: 1439187037

Available at the Washington State Library
Audio book available through the publisher.

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WSL Updates for October 30, 2014

October 30th, 2014 Will Stuivenga Posted in For Libraries, News, Training and Continuing Education, Updates No Comments »

Volume 10, October 30, 2014 for the WSL Updates mailing list

Topics include:

1) LIFE AFTER GETTING AN MLIS

2) ONECLICK + ZINIO RENEWAL OPTIONS

3) ALA STRATEGIC PLANNING

4) OCLC MEMBER FORUM

5) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

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1) LIFE AFTER GETTING AN MLIS

November’s First Tuesdays program features Life After Getting an MLIS, a panel discussion facilitated by Adrienne Doman Calkins from the Sherwood Public Library in Oregon. New(ish) librarians share their post-MLIS reflections: career-advancing strategies that work (or don’t), classes that proved most helpful (or not) post-graduation, advice worth passing on to current MLIS students, and staying informed about emerging trends and technologies.

This free First Tuesdays webinar will take place November 4, 2014 from 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. PST. Instructions for joining the webinar are at sos.wa.gov/q/FirstTuesdays. First Tuesdays are a continuing education opportunity presented by Washington State Library.

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2) ONECLICK + ZINIO RENEWAL OPTIONS

This information is for public and academic libraries participating in the OneClickdigital contract with Recorded Books through the State Library. To offset the end of LSTA subsidies these libraries have been receiving, Recorded Books is offering significant renewal discounts for the coming year. These libraries have a choice between options that bundle Zinio, the popular magazine reading platform, with OneClickdigital at no additional base cost or that maintain current library costs even without the subsidy.

The renewal date is in April of each year for most participants but, for some libraries or schools, the renewal comes at other times. Because many libraries are currently planning their 2015 budgets, this notice is provided now.

For more information, and to obtain specific renewal options for your library:

For information on joining this group purchase, which is open to nonprofit public, academic, and K12 libraries:

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3) ALA STRATEGIC PLANNING

American Library Association (ALA) President Courtney Young will moderate three virtual town hall meetings where members can share their thoughts and ideas on ALA’s future.  Dates and topics for these meeting are:

November 19: Advocacy;

  • November 20: Information Policy;
  • December 11: Professional and Leadership Development.

For more information, please visit ALA Strategic Planning.

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4) OCLC MEMBER FORUM

Discuss and learn about the latest in OCLC Cataloging and Metadata, FirstSearch and Discovery, and Resource Sharing.  Eric Forte, OCLC Member Liaison, invites you to a regional Member Forum.

Thursday, November 20, 2014 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.

Space is limited. For more information and to register, please visit OCLC Member Forum.

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5) FREE CE OPPORTUNITIES NEXT WEEK

Monday, November 3:

Tuesday, November 4:

Wednesday, November 5:

Thursday, November 6:

For more information and to register (unless otherwise linked above), visit the WSL Training Calendar at sos.wa.gov/q/training.

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